Perverting the Course of Justice

There has been a lot in the press about of perverting the course of justice in connection with penalty points. The cases of Chris Huhne and Vicky Price have shown us how serious it is to lie about driving offences like speeding to the police. A false declaration about something quite minor can often result in a prison sentence.

If the police have accused you of perverting the course of justice and you want to challenge the case against you, I may be able to help. If you are thinking of pleading guilty to perverting the course of justice and you want advice, I can help with that too.

Penalties for Perverting the Course of Justice

The maximum sentence for perverting the course of justice is:

  • Life imprisonment

Cases involving penalty points and speeding never result in life imprisonment. Typical sentences are between 6 and 18 months. Courts do not have to pass a prison sentence. I have personally dealt with a case that resulted in a fine.

Crown Court or Magistrates’ Court?

Perverting the course of justice trials and guilty pleas are dealt with in the Crown Court.

Perverting the course of Justice at the Crown Court
Birmingham Crown Court by Elliott Brown

Things I Look Out For in a Perverting the Course of Justice Case

  • Is there any evidence that the accused was guilty
  • Errors in procedure by the police
  • Errors in procedure by the prosecution
  • Can the prosecution prove that the accused intended to pervert the course of public justice
  • Is it possible to negotiate a charge of obstructing the police or wasting police time
  • Is is possible to negotiate a police caution or a fixed penalty for wasting police time
  • If the driver is pleading guilty is there some important mitigation that can reduce the sentence and avoid a prison sentence

Find out more

Unsure If You Need Legal Representation for Perverting the Course of Justice?

Before you decide if you need a solicitor, call me or send a message under no obligation.

CALL: 0330 111 6074

 

 

Photo Birmingham Crown Court by Elliott Brown / CC BY